Hedges.. o hedges.. make it so..

I am ordering in 100 new cedar babies from the county tree program this year and will do  hundred more next years is the plan, and I have swack of native black willow whips to move over and start them going for a pollarding project to increase massively my tree hay..

The rest of the layers will come from local natural sources on Farmer R  hay fields or forest bush edges combined with me starting lots of baby for transplanting out and over for backfilling.

Very excited about this up and coming rural skills working network here in ontario

https://www.ontarioruralskillsnetwork.com/

https://www.ontarioruralskillsnetwork.com/hedgelaying-inthe-ontario-landscape

In 2018-19 the project continues, to explore the uses of hedgerows, hedgelaying and rural skills in scoio-ecological contexts. Jim Jones, Visiting Scientist at the Waterloo Institute for Social Innovation and Resilience and an ecologist, hedgelayer and green woodworker from the UK, is working with the project offering advice and delivering workshops on hedgerows, hedgelaying and other traditional rural skills and acting us a ‘curator’ of this new space.

Ontario Rural Skills Network (ORSN)
The HOL project is building on the hedgelaying demonstrations undertaken in 2016 by developing a series of small craft-scale, traditional woodland management and production activities as revenue streams in terms of both products and training/leisure services. These will include greenwood work/bodging, basket making, scything, coppicing, pollarding, bow making, and artisan charcoal making.

I am very excited to watch this space for coming workshops and also to consider working with them and considering having a workshop on the farm to putting in a new mixed hedge row. It sure would make things happen faster with extra hands..

I am also thinking of getting in touch with them and having a chat about skills I could offer to teach classes.. we will see..

Lee Valley tools has some amazing tools that will be of great help in regards to my hedge row building and pollarding the bill hook

as well as a outstanding new to me cane cutter. for regular cutting and clean up it well worth giving this try, adding in a way to keep on top of the wild fruiting cane and expect it will also work to thin out wild roses as well

This was as far as I had gotten in this post and out came C5 newest post.. about tools, hedging and so on..

Now I have to admit that I did chuckle to read C5’s latest post, because we had not talked about it but once again great minds think alike and at times and we are both planning, working and expanding our hedges this year.. the fact that we also got some of the same older fashion tools should not really surprise me either.

Adding in Green Mountain Research Centers Direct comments to this post

“Hey everyone. I do love when people… think I am an expert in anything. LOL. I’m amazed how many people quote ‘C5″ now days. “Let us use commas and semicolons with reckless abandon”.
I thought I would send a note on your willows. The big thing I didnt take into account is the deer. Fresh buds is what the want more than grass. They stay away from the dogs near the house but the cheaky buggers will come right up during the night.
I have to go back to some of my willow planting and put a temporary fence up any place dear graze to convince them not to top what I planted, until the plants can get over nibbling height. Its just going to be some stakes and recycled twine from hay bales we refuse to throw away…like any good bag lady. It wont stop the deer. Im just convincing the deer to go someplace easier.
I did this before with some volunteer cherry trees by putting a dead hedge around it as a temporary fence. I have to fill it with left over branches each year to make up for it decomposing…but it is working. A couple more years and I can tear the dead hedge down. You really see the difference. On one side, its nibbled down. The other side is taking over. The deer could hop over but its just easier to walk around and nibble elsewhere.”

I will very interested in see how his projects go and I will be sharing mine and I will be doing my best to get that to a training session with the expert that is from over seas and pick is head for ways to make what I have work, I can keep doing the hedges, they are coming but extra eyes and skills bump great.. proper teach for pollarding.. priceless and so needed!”

I will be starting my hedge row rose seeds soon, I want them to act as a very pretty ouchy wall but equally, I want those hips available for harvest :).. soon.. soon another three weeks..

 

This entry was posted in Food Forest, Garden, Garden harvest and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Hedges.. o hedges.. make it so..

  1. Sheri Zone 8b says:

    Why the cedars? I have a friend who farms 800 acres and they are always removing the conifers.They take over good pasture lands thus removing grazing. That’s another reason why forest fires are so important, the conifer takes over, burns.. then the charcoal/ash changes soil back to alkaline and deciduous & grasses move back in. That is why the elk, deer & bison herds thrived after the Yellowstone Park burned.

    • Hi Sheri.. I took a weekend off and this post was not quite finished before it went out.. I thought I had it held till I would back today and could tweek it but I didn’t book it right somehow.. the cedars are going into the hedge rows for winter green, coming fence posts and for cedar for some salves and such.. Its the Black Willow that is going into the tree fodder.. Sorry about not getting that clear enough..

      • Sheri Zone 8b says:

        Okay. I can see if you have a large enough property putting in a evergreen buffer as long as you plant it where it doesn’t cast shadow on your pasture. I would like to have a good source of Juniper berries, Pine nuts and maybe a few other forest dwellers.

      • I buy enough hay now that I would rather have the extra’s.. the cost of a good cedar fence post right now is crazy and I know I will need to refence in X amount of years.. I might as well grow the posts myself. I like the idea very much of a mixed pasture. Even if it means moving the sheep around more.

  2. Hey everyone. I do love when people… think I am an expert in anything. LOL. I’m amazed how many people quote ‘C5″ now days. “Let us use commas and semicolons with reckless abandon”.

    I thought I would send a note on your willows. The big thing I didnt take into account is the deer. Fresh buds is what the want more than grass. They stay away from the dogs near the house but the cheaky buggers will come right up during the night.

    I have to go back to some of my willow planting and put a temporary fence up any place dear graze to convince them not to top what I planted, until the plants can get over nibbling height. Its just going to be some stakes and recycled twine from hay bales we refuse to throw away…like any good bag lady. It wont stop the deer. Im just convincing the deer to go someplace easier.

    I did this before with some volunteer cherry trees by putting a dead hedge around it as a temporary fence. I have to fill it with left over branches each year to make up for it decomposing…but it is working. A couple more years and I can tear the dead hedge down. You really see the difference. On one side, its nibbled down. The other side is taking over. The deer could hop over but its just easier to walk around and nibble elsewhere.

    • LOL.. I stand by the fact that I am greatly amused that we were both writing about Billhooks at the same time! I have added your comments directly into the post so that folks can read them there as well. I expect for me.. it will be the sheep that give me a run for my money that will need to be carefully managed. I have yet? to have a issue with the deer.. now the odd rabbit.. that’s a different thing.. bad rabbit!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s