Growing in Straw- Spud report for 2014

Growing in Straw potato`s this year.. All new spuds kinds to us.. As you know.. Lots of rain this year..

p6

ROW 1: “ALASKAN (?)” – White w/ red skin

The row produced 63 lbs, with a reasonable size range. Shape was generally satisfactory with few “nodules”. Only minor issues with rot and pestilence were noted, with no UV damage. The potatoes were generally found at the soil/straw interface, but a number were wholly within straw and occasionally were found after chunks of straw had been discarded. It may not be a coincidence that this variety had the most individual plants and produced the most weight.

we planted 5 pounds, our yield was 12.6x, pretty good.

ROW 2 – “ALL BLUE” – Blue w/ purple skin

The row produced 48 lbs, with a reasonable size range. Shape was generally satisfactory, with a number of lengthy potatoes that would be well suited for french fry making. Only minor issues with rot and pestilence were noted, with no UV damage (note that blue pigmentation is supposed to reduce UV damage anyway). Potatoes were generally found at the soil/straw interface but rare examples were wholly within dirt. Redigging the row might produce a few additional spuds. The color of the potatoes did make it a bit more of a challenge to find in the dark material.

Online source indicates a yield of 10x – 15x is possible under optimal conditions. we planted 5 lbs, we got a yield of 9.6x, good.

ROW 3: “ALL RED” – Red w/ red skin

This was a partial row with only seven plants. It produced 41 lbs of good potatoes and 3 lbs of rejects, with a mix of rot, pestilence, and suspected UV damage (color was creamy, rather than green). Size and shape were mostly good, but the hills were generally “stuffed” and projecting to surface with small potatoes. A few odd shapes were observed. It’s thought that these hills were planted with whole potatoes and thus might’ve done better if the seeds had been split before planting.

Online source indicates a yield of 10x to 15x is possible under optimal conditions. we planted 5 lbs, we got a yield of 8.8x, good.

ROW 3/4: “DUKE OF YORK” – White w/ yellow skin

This was an oversized row and a half that produced 34 lbs of good potatoes and 17 lbs of bad potatoes. Rot, pestilence, and particularly UV damage were noted, even in potatoes that appeared to have been covered; the straw may have still permitted light in. Shapes often included nodules, and even the accepted potatoes often have rough looking skin. Some hills projected to the surface, contributing to losses.

It’s possible seeds needed to be further split or more deeply planted, but given how the other three varieties did, and that the total weight harvested was comparable, I’m inclined to think it’s just not as suitable a variety for this sort of planting. Some online reading characterizes this variety as “early” so we may also have lost simply because they should have been harvested sooner than was done.

we planted 5 lbs, our yield was 10.2x, which is good

p4

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13 Responses to Growing in Straw- Spud report for 2014

  1. Sheri says:

    Nice job!

  2. I emptied my potato bin from the roof yesterday – it was a mix of straw and soil and I got 10 potatoes. Not pounds, 10 individual potatoes. Which beats the year I got exact 3, but not by much. Most of them area good size, and I got a few of each colour, yellow and purple. So it’s possible to grow them on the roof, but I guess I need to add more layers or more plants.

  3. canadiandoomer says:

    We didn’t weigh them. We got 3 very full commercial ice cream buckets, plus a few I grabbed earlier. I should have hilled them, which I didn’t do. Growing in straw was bad for us because the chickens got at them.

  4. Nadine says:

    Do you have a potato bug problem at all? What do you do to get rid of them? When I grew at the community garden last year it was pretty infested, I wanted to go without chemicals but I had to save my plants so sprayed those bugs and the plants were ok, until a second wave of them came thru…plus not everyone uses the same method to get rid of the bugs, so they had different areas to eat.

  5. Pingback: Seed Potato’s are ordered for 2016 | Just another Day on the Farm

  6. Pingback: Wednesday Flash back.. | Just another Day on the Farm

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