Working on my new bushes list for 2012

Well, its not final yet, but I think I have narrowed down my list of fruiting and or health/herb bushes to add to the farm this year.. Here is what I have to date..

  • Smoky Saskatoon
  • Shadblow Serviceberry
  • Allegnery Serviceberry
  • Common Witch Hazel
  • Sea Buckthorn (Another female to go with my current females and male)
  • Bayberry
  • Nanking Cherry
  • Alexander Mackenzie Rose
  • Golden Elderberry
  • Buffalo Berry
  • Nanny Berry
  • High Bush Cranberry
  • Hinnnmeakio Gooseberry
  • Jostaberry
  • Red Jackels-Currents
  • White Pearl -Currents
  • Black Chokeberry

A few of these can be gotten in the wild and moved to the farm but most of them are going to be bought from a local nursery up the road about 40 min, they don’t sell though the mail or any other carrier, if you want their stock, you have to pick it up.. still their choices are excellent, the prices a very good compared to the order catalogs.

Its hard to believe with the soft christmas snow falling that spring is just around the corner, but it so is! We have the farm and garden seminars coming in Feb, our big  local Seedy Saturday is coming in march, as is the huge green expo, plus I have found my first farm sale in march.. o my, there are some very interesting things that I would love to have join me on the farm, so many things that have clearly sat for years covered in dust in the photos but I would put them into use again here on the farm.

It would be wondeful to get another wind break row of different fruiting, flowering bushes, draft fruit tree’s planted out this year, got to love hiding food in plain site.. most folks see a rose bush, I see a local 0 mile source of vit C. They see winter bird fruit, I see Saskatoons, High Bush Cranberry, Black Choke Berry and Elderberry..

Are you either planting or replacing many of your “just for looks” things in the yard with bushes that not only look good but also produce fresh food for you and your family?

What hiding in plain site food producing bush are you adding to your yard this year??

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6 Responses to Working on my new bushes list for 2012

  1. Deb Weyrich-Cody says:

    Hey FarmGal, I’ve been a firm believer in using native plants forever. That’s how my Dad rejuvenated the farm decades ago and, with two acres of rocky, former pasture to fill, there’s no point in spending time and effort on something that has to be babied along and may not survive the weather extremes like the ones we’ve been getting lately. Feeding our family and having some extra for the wildlife is the only way to go.
    Would you mind sharing the name of your nursery? Finding a good source of native plants is worth the drive…
    Christmas snow? You’ve got that right! I was just thinking this morning that this whole “winter” has been like one, long December (and personally speaking, I’d rather have a crisp, sunny cold than this damp cold any day!)

    • http://www.gottardfarm.ca/

      Is the main one I use, I used to have one that was alot closer but they closed down, and then I had one kind of in the middle but finally figured out that they were buying them from this farm, so why not go directly to the source.

      Its got some amazingly different ones compared to what you can find in the local stores, I look forward to seeing what is new for this season!

  2. Brittany P. says:

    We are adding loquat! We have had the idea of moving some of the native plants growing in the woods around our house to the open so they can flourish and provide more trees for wildlife. Mostly, we are adding more fruit trees this year such as pears, figs, plums, and pomegranates. I wish you the best of luck with your plants this year. You sound like me… so little time, so many plants to plant. :o)

  3. Hi, I’ve bough trees from theses guys, a bit of a drive from the east.

    http://www.siloamorchards.com/
    Canada’s largest collection of heirloom, disease resistant and cider apple trees, winter hardy heirlooms for harsh climates

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