Taking the Wind Out of Jerusalem Artichokes

I will be trying this myself and reporting back but what a great post!

A Gardener's Table

jerusalem artichokes Jerusalem artichokes look like thick, pale gingerroots.

Does your spouse refuse to eat Jerusalem artichokes because they’re too—err—windy? Have you yourself abandoned your Jerusalem artichoke patch to the weeds or the pigs, because no human of your acquaintance would eat the damn things again? If so, you have plenty of company.

If you can’t quite place this native North American vegetable, you may know it instead by a name invented by a California produce wholesaler in the 1960s: the sunchoke. The sun part of this moniker comes from sunflower, because the plant is closely related to the sunflower that provides us seeds for birds and snacks and oil. Jerusalem artichoke blooms look like small sunflowers, and they can grow just as tall.

The Jerusalem part of Jerusalem artichoke came about soon after the plants were first grown in Europe, in the early seventeenth century at the Farnese Garden in Rome…

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2 Responses to Taking the Wind Out of Jerusalem Artichokes

  1. Nicola says:

    It worked for me when I did some in the fall. They are delicious too. Fermented turnip is amazing too, just in case you never tried it.

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