Eating Cattail Root.

Hi Guys, Peter is one of our great local Forage leaders in the Local Ottawa Area. He is such a down to earth great guy. When this video came across my facebook feed, I asked nicely if it could be set to public so I could share it on the blog..  Thank you for being willing to do so Peter and Karen.

Thank you Valerie for sharing my sister’s video! It was an impromptu video so I missed a few things I wanted to point out. There are many edible plants out there, but in a survival situation, most green vegetables do not have sufficient carbohydrates or fats to nourish our bodies, cattails are one of the few exceptions. Although I wouldn’t recommend expending extra energy digging up rootstalks to make flour in a survival situation, the starchy bases of the new growth shoots can be easily pulled up, sometimes with a bit of rootstalk attached. Just a dozen of these should provide a much needed serving of carbohydrates. Although I did eat this raw, if you are not certain of the water conditions, it is best to cook it first, and do not harvest from polluted waters.

 

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4 Responses to Eating Cattail Root.

  1. Great idea. Thank you for suggesting it and to Peter for sharing his knowledge: )

  2. Peter Bisson says:

    Thank you Valerie for sharing my sister’s video! It was an impromptu video so I missed a few things I wanted to point out. There are many edible plants out there, but in a survival situation, most green vegetables do not have sufficient carbohydrates or fats to nourish our bodies, cattails are one of the few exceptions. Although I wouldn’t recommend expending extra energy digging up rootstalks to make flour in a survival situation, the starchy bases of the new growth shoots can be easily pulled up, sometimes with a bit of rootstalk attached. Just a dozen of these should provide a much needed serving of carbohydrates. Although I did eat this raw, if you are not certain of the water conditions, it is best to cook it first, and do not harvest from polluted waters.

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